Bike in Halton and enjoy all we have to offer

From flat urban paths to rolling rural routes, cycling in Halton can appeal to any level of cyclist.

Recently, we updated the Cycling in Halton Map. The cycling map will help you plan routes throughout the Region and provides helpful tips for safe cycling. Seven routes are highlighted in addition to the on-road bike lanes, and multi-use paths through each municipality.

Riding your bike can be much more than a fun, healthy, recreational activity. You can also use it for riding to the grocery store or to work. Did you know that 1/3 of all trips by car in Halton are less than 5 km? That’s a distance that can easily be biked! Not only will it help you be more physically active, but cycling is one of the most environmentally friendly modes of transportation. Visit your municipality’s websites for more information on bike lanes and paths in your neighbourhood.

Whether you’re cycling along our waterfront in Oakville and Burlington or more northerly in Milton and Halton Hills, there’s something for everyone who wants to get outside and stay active.

The Cycling in Halton Map will be ready in early May. If you would like a copy of the Cycling in Halton Map, please dial 311, email accesshalton@halton.ca or come in to the Regional headquarters at 1151 Bronte Road, Oakville.

I hope you enjoy your cycling in Halton. You will see why Halton Region is such a great place to live, work, raise a family and retire.

Municipal cycling web pages:

If you have any Regional concerns or comments you would like to share, please feel free to email me at gary.carr@halton.ca. To receive further updates on Regional issues, please subscribe to my quarterly e-newsletter, “The Carr Report.”

Halton Goes Round

Ensuring the right infrastructure is in the right place at the right time is a responsibility Halton Regional Council takes very seriously. In 2011, Halton Region is making a significant commitment to infrastructure with funding of more than $190 million, this year alone.

Part of this infrastructure funding went to creating the first Regional dual-lane roundabout, at Tremaine Road (Regional Road 22) and Main Street in Milton, which opened in October.

A roundabout is a circular intersection where all the cars drive counterclockwise with a centre island in the middle. Instead of stopping at a stop sign, cars that want to enter the roundabout have to yield to traffic already in it. Even though roundabouts are common around the world, especially in Europe and Australia, there are relatively few in Canada.

Roundabouts have a proven track record of improving safety and traffic flow, while also having environmental benefits by minimizing unnecessary stops and idling. Because multi-lane roundabouts are new to the community, we’ve created a detailed web page with all the information drivers will need to properly navigate the roundabout.

To help educate drivers on the proper use of roundabouts, our web pages includes a detailed flash animation instructional program. The program gives examples of all types of movements through a dual-lane roundabout for cars, trucks, bicycles and pedestrians.

Thank you to all the area drivers for your patience during construction as we Build a Better Halton.

If you have any Regional concerns or comments you would like to share, please feel free to email me at gary.carr@halton.ca. To receive further updates on Regional issues, please subscribe to my quarterly e-newsletter, “The Carr Report.”

Planning the Road to Change together

Do you know what you’ll be doing in 2031? Probably not, but thanks to your input we have developed a plan for what the Regional transportation system will look like in 20 years.

On October 5, Regional Council approved Halton’s most recent Transportation Master Plan called The Road to Change which plans our transportation system up to the year 2031. By approving this master plan, Halton Regional Council continues its progressive and long term perspective on planning for growth in Halton.

Our transportation system is made up of a network of roads and services owned and operated by the Province, the Region and the Local Municipalities. Our Transportation Master Plan looks at all of these components and provides a long range plan to ensure that Halton residents and businesses can travel throughout the Region in a safe and efficient manner.  

The Regional road system includes more than $1 billion in road related infrastructure, with more than 900 lane km of roads, 206 traffic signals and 122 bridges and large culverts. Over the next 20 years the work identified through the Transportation Master Plan will bring the value of our transportation infrastructure to over $3 billion.

Halton’s transportation system must provide us with options and seamless travel within Halton and the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area. However, it’s not enough to just widen roads in order to accommodate the travel demand in 2031.  We also need to incorporate new road corridors, provide for cycling and walking, promote travel demand management External Link (such as carpooling) and accommodate enhanced municipal and inter-regional (GO) transit services.

I’d like to thank those of you who have attended past meetings and the workshop on our Transportation Master Plan – The Road to Change and given us your feedback, ideas and possible solutions for developing a Regional transportation network we can all be proud of.

Working together, we can ensure that Halton Region remains a great place to live, work, raise a family and retire.

If you have any Regional concerns or comments you would like to share, please feel free to email me at gary.carr@halton.ca. To receive further updates on Regional issues, please subscribe to my quarterly e-newsletter, “The Carr Report.”

Building a Better Halton by Investing in Transportation

Did you know that Halton Region, working with all levels of government and guided by a Transportation Master Plan, provides a safe, well-managed transportation network that includes 305 km of Regional roads, 88 bridges and 208 traffic signals? This network supports our vibrant local economy and the needs of residents and businesses.

We know, and you have also told us, that transportation and well maintained and planned for infrastructure, is critical to our residents and businesses and because of that we’re investing the majority of our 2011 Building a Better Halton capital program for Public Works into our transportation system. This year alone $132.6 million will be spent on road infrastructure widening and rehabilitation.

The 2011 transportation capital budget includes funding for the construction of James Snow Parkway (Regional Road 4) and a grade separation north of Steeles Avenue in Milton; the widening of Dundas Street (Regional Road 5) in Burlington and Oakville; completing the Upper Middle Road (Regional Road 38) widening in Oakville; the Regional Road 25 widening in Oakville and Milton; starting the engineering on a grade separation at the Canadian National Railway crossway at Derry Road (Regional Road 7) in Milton; rehabilitating the Stewarttown bridge on Trafalgar Road (Regional Road 3) in Halton Hills; and more transportation projects that will help Build a Better Halton.

Widening our Regional roads to reduce commute and travel times is only one part of the solution to improving transportation in Halton – by encouraging more people to carpool or take public transit, we will help reduce the number of one-driver vehicles on our roads.

For this reason, we’re proud to partner with Metrolinx on the Smart Commute Halton External Link program. This great program allows Halton companies to sign up as a Smart Commute employer External Link to help improve their staff’s commuting options. Halton residents can also connect with the Smart Commute program through the Carpool Zone External Link to find people with similar commuting options in order to find a carpooling partner.

I’m also happy that in November, Metrolinx announced the extension of the GO Transit rail service on the Georgetown line to Acton, with two morning and two evening trains to Acton scheduled to begin by the end of this year.

To further encourage public transit and alternatives to single-driver vehicles on our roads, Halton is also working with the Town of Oakville and City of Burlington to investigate the feasibility of Bus Rapid Transit lanes on Dundas Street (Regional Road 5) in Burlington and Oakville and Trafalgar Road (Regional Road 3) in Oakville.

We’re making a significant commitment to infrastructure because it’s the right decision for Halton. Improving your quality of life – whether it’s helping to reduce commute times or providing you with clean, safe drinking water – is a top priority. I’d like to thank all our residents and businesses for their patience during construction as we work to Build a Better Halton and encourage you to learn more about the planning and construction of our infrastructure projects from our website at www.halton.ca/construction.

Working together, we can ensure that Halton remains a great place to live, work, raise a family and retire.

If you have any Regional concerns or comments you would like to share, please feel free to email me at gary.carr@halton.ca. To receive further updates on Regional issues, please subscribe to my quarterly e-newsletter, “The Carr Report.”

Building a Better Halton through our Transportation Master Plan

For the last year, staff have been consulting with residents and stakeholders to develop Halton Region’s Transportation Master Plan – The Road to Change. This plan will provide the strategies and tools needed to safely and cost-effectively meet the Region’s transportation needs to the year 2031.

This week, we were pleased to offer Public Information Centres in Milton and Halton Hills outlining details of The Road to Change. Two more sessions are scheduled for March 22 in Burlington and March 24 in Oakville so that you can learn more about our plan and let us know your thoughts. You can find out more details about the meetings by looking in your local paper or online at www.halton.ca/htmp.

Given the busy lives of Halton’s residents and businesses, we also recognize that some people simply are unable to make it out to one of our public meetings to let us know their thoughts – so we’re also providing online options so people can share their ideas with us at a time that works for them. You can either send us an email to transportation@halton.ca or complete the online comment form at www.halton.ca/htmp by April 8, 2011. 

Halton is responsible for all aspects of the Regional Road system, including the planning, design, construction, operation, maintenance and overall management of more than $1 billion in road-related infrastructure. With more than 900 lane km of Regional Roads, 206 Regional traffic signals, and 122 bridges and large culverts, Regional transportation is an issue that’s important to all of us.

I’d like to thank those of you who have attended past meetings and the workshop on our Transportation Master Plan – The Road to Change and provided your feedback, ideas, possible opportunities and alternative solutions for developing the ideal Regional transportation network. And I’d like to encourage anyone else who has thoughts to share your ideas going forward.

At Halton, we are committed to building a better Halton, and have therefore allocated significant amounts of money towards roads and infrastructure.  This year alone, we will be investing over $130 million in transportation infrastructure projects, this is approximately triple the amount that was spent in 2006. All of Halton’s new roads are paid for by development charges, so that Halton taxpayers are not burdened with the cost of growth. 

Working together, we can ensure that Halton Region remains a great place to live, work, raise a family and retire. For more information on The Road to Change, please visit our website at www.halton.ca/htmp.

If you have any Regional concerns or comments you would like to share, please feel free to email me at gary.carr@halton.ca. To receive further updates on Regional issues, please subscribe to my quarterly e-newsletter, “The Carr Report.”